Carbureter.

Abstract

Claims

A. W. FARRELL. CARBURETER. APPLICATION FILED FEB.19. 191's. . Patented Jan. 5, 1915 2 SHEETSSHEET1 Ed /fan A. W. FARRELL. OARBURETBR. APPLICATION FILED PEB.19.1913. 1 13 5 Patented Jan.5, 1915. 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2" anon w. rananrr, or auno, rrmnors. CB'URETER'. niaasoa, tpecification of Letters Patent. Patented dad, a, rare, application filed February 19, 1913. Serial No. 719,315. for internal combustion engines, and is de 'slgned for using kerosene oil as fuel, and is particularly adapted for use in connection with automobile engines. One object ofmy invention is to provide means controlled by the speed of the engine for regulating the supply of vaporized kerosene according to said speed, for likewise regulating the supply of air and the extent to which the throttle may be opened by the operator. Uther objects are to provide means for thoroughly mixing the air with the vaporized kerosene; for removing any condensation of oil from the mixing chamber,-and for automatically emptying a'drip' tank or trap into which the condensed oil is led; for reducing the pressure in the gas supply passages in case the engine back fires and for preventing the flames from igniting the vaporized oil at or near the oiPjets in case of such back-firing. Other objects and their resultant advantages will become apparent as'the nature of my invention becomes better understood from the followingdeseription and accompanying drawings, in which "latter Figure 1 is a vertical sectionalview showing my carbureter complete, and the condensation trap; Fig. 2 is a horizontal sectional view taken along the line 22 of Fig. 1 looking down; Fig. 3 is an 'e'mvlarged detail I perspective view of the oil-spray controlling fingers or levers and the parts connected thereto; Fig. 1 is an enlarged detail of "the mechanism for controlling the inlet and outlet openings of the .condensation trap.- lln the present embodiment of my invention as shown in the drawings, kerosene is fed into a substantially horizontal vaporizing pipe 1, placed at the top of the chimney 2, of a lamp or heater 3. From this pipe 1, a plurality of spray tubes 4, extend verticallyinto' the mixing chamber '5, the upper end of each of these tubes 4, being opened or closed by needle valves consisting of pointed rods 6, slidably mounted in suitable bosses 7, formed integral with the upper wall of the mixing chamber. The'upper end of each valve rod 6, projects through a perforation in a substantially horizontal-lever or finger 7, all of the, said levers 7' being rigidly mounted upon a rocker shaft 8, carried by bearings 9. Also mounted on this shaft 8, is a bell-crank lever having one arm 10 connected by a tension spring 11, to the adjacent boss 7*,while the other arm 12, impinges upon the lower end of a bushing 18, slidably mounted upon a vertical shaft 14:, rotated by the engine, said bushing 13 adapted to be moved up or down by a suit able governor 15, which varies in the position of its parts with the speed at which it is rotated. llhe shaft 1 1, is driven at the same rate of speed as the crank shaft of the engine, through the pulley 16, fastened to the upper end of the shaft 1 1, and a belt 17. Nuts 18, on the valve rods 6, above the levers 7, enable the said rods to be raised or lowered so as to afford a suitable adjust ment of the spray openings. Instead of being substantially in horizontal alinement, the levers 7 are tilted at successively increasing angles, so that a rocking of the shaft 8 will not open all of the needle valves simultaneously, but will open first one, then the second, then the third, and so on as the speed of the engine increases. By adjusting the nuts 18, the rate at which the oil sup-' ply is increased by an increase in the speed of the engine may readily be varied. The bell crank arm 10 also is connected by. a pitman 19, with an arm 20, securely fixed to the upper end of a vertical shaft 21, extending downwardly through the mixing chamber 5, ' rotating the shaft 8 and causing the levers 7 to raise the rods 6, one after another as the speed of the engine is increased, thus opening. theneedle valves successively. At the same time, the pitinan 19' will cooperate with the arm 20,,to rotate the shaft 21, and swing the vane22, so that the air supply, in- stead of all being deflected toward the first valve. opening or spray tube, as shown in Fig. 2, will be "distributed over more and more ,of the spray tubes as the same are ire ' than the other. opened by the levers 7, lifting the rods 6. The air thus passingthe tops of the spray tubes 4, will inter-mingle with the vaporized kerosene as it leaves said spray tubes and thus makes the explosive mixture. .- Adjacent to the vaporizing tubes *4, I preferably provide a series of wire screens,. one screen 24 being of very fine mesh and. posltionedhorizontally over a downward enlargement 25, of the carbureter, from which a drain pipe 26, leads to a trap 27, placed below the carbureter." From opposite ends' of the screen 24, screens 28 and 29 ex tend transversely across the. mixing chamher 5, and'are united at their upper ends to the top wall of the carbureter. The screen 28, or the one" nearer the vaporizer tubes 4,. being preferably of coarser mesh In practice, these transverse screens 28 and 29 create whirls within the chamber 5, thereby causing theair and the gas produced by the vaporizing of the which latter has a slotted end 36. engaging a pin 37, upon the bell crank arm-'10, whereby the length of the slot in the rod 35 will limit the extent to which the throttle may be moved. Consequently, when the engine is running at low speed, the position of the pin 37, with respect to the ends of the slot 36, in the rod 35, will only allow-the throttle to. be opened slightly, but as the speed of the engine is increased and the governor changes the position of the pin 37, the the throttle32 may be opened wider and wider. Hence the mechanism just described will not interfere with giving an ample charge to the engine when it is running at high speed, but will compel the operator to economize on the charge for the engine. when it is running at low speed. The trap'27 preferably has an outlet pipe 1 i 38, positionedgdirectly under the drain pipe 1:255? andjin line with ,the same, theopenings fromYthe' interiorof thetrap to both pipes. being controlled by a reciprocable rod 39, adapted to close either one of the said openings. Within the trap is a float 40, carried by one armof a U-shaped lever 41, pivotally mounted upon a transverse shaft 42, and which lever is adapted to be raised and loweredby the float 40. A throw-over lever 43, is mounted upon the same shaft 42, as the U-shaped lever 41, and is adapted to be moved in either direction by impingement against opposite sides thereof of adjusting screws 44, carried by the U-shaped lever 41. This throw-over lever 43 is connected by a tension spring 45 to the shaft 42. When the trap is empty, or nearly so, the float 40, will be in the position shown in full lines in Fig. 1, and the outer end of the throw-over lever 43, will impinge downwardly on a projection 46, on the rod 39, thereby keeping the opening of .the outlet pipe 38 tightly closed and the opening of the drain pipe26 open. As the amount of oil in the trap increases the float 40 will be raised, thereby raising the throw-over lever 43, by impingement thereagainst of the adjusting screws 44, on the lower arm of the U-shaped' lever 41, until the axis of the spring 45 has passed the center of the shaft 42. When this occurs, the throw-over lever 43 will be drawn to the positions shown by dotted linesin Fig. 1, thereby impinging against the upper projection 46, on the rod 39, and opening the outlet pipe 38, while closin the drain pipe 26. Then when the oi runs out through the pipe 38,-it lowers the float 40, which co-acts with the throw-over lever 43, the spring 45, and the lower projection 46, to return the recipro'cable rod 39 to its original position. 1 Adjacent to the bend of theU-shaped outote door 47, which is normally kept'tig tly closed by a spring 48. In case the. engine back fires the pressure of the. exploded mixture in the pipe 30 will open' the door .47, after which the. spring 48 will return. the door to its original or closed position.- Should the flame still strike back beyond let pipe 30, I provide the latter with a ivthe bend and the throttle 32, the transverse screens 28 and 29 will prevent the flame from igniting the oil at the vaporizing tubes 4. While I have shown my carbureter as being, provided with fivejspray tubes and five needle valves, (each of which is normally pressed downward by. a. separate spring 49), it will be "evident that this number may be varied if desired, and also that various other changes may be made without departing .from the spirit' of my invention, and furthermorethat gas'olene or any other suitable hydro-carbon can be used instead of kerosene. I Having thus fully described my, invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is 1. In a carbureter for an internal combustion engine, a vaporizer, a mixing chamber, .a plurality of fuel openings leading from said vaporizer into the mixing chamber independent and adjustable, valves controlling the separate fuel'openings, a governor actuated by the engine, and means actuated by the governor for opening the said valvessuccessiv'ely as the speed of the engine in- 2. In a carbureter for an internal combustion engine,"a vaporizer, a mixing chamber, a plurality of fuel openings leading from said vaporizer into the mixing chamber, spring returned valves controlling the separate fuel openings, a governor actuated by the engine, means actuated by the governor for opening the said valves successively as the speed of the engine increases, and adjustable screw caps on said valve .for varying the movement thereof. , 3. In a carbureter for an internal combustion engine, a vaporizer, a mixing chamber, 4L. lln a carbureter for an internal combustion engine, a vaporizer, a mixing chamber, a plurality of fuel openings leading from said vaporizer into the mixing chamber, valves controlling the separate fuel openings,.a governor actuated by the engine, means actuated bythe governor for opening the said valves successively asthe speed of the engine increases, an air inlet for the mixing chamber, a pivoted vane interposed intermediate of the air'inlet andthe said openings, and means actuated by the governor for swinging the said vane; 5. In a carbureter for an internalcombustion engine, a vaporizer, a'mixing chamber, a plurality of fuel openings lng from said vaporizer into the chamber," valves controlling the separate fuel openings, a governor actuated by the engine, means actuated by the governor for ating the said valves suc cessively as the e the 'engine increases, an air inlet for the mixing chamber, a movable vane interposed between the air inlet and the said openin, and means actuated by the governor 1 moving the said vane out'of shielding relation to the said fuel openings as the same are uncovered by the valves. tion engine, a mixing chamber and oil inlet, a vaporizer and an air inlet connected thereto, an outlet for the mixing chamber there being a downward enlargement in the mixing chamber intermediate of thevaporizer and the outlet, a meshed partitioninter mediate ofthesaid enlargement of the mix ing chamber and the main portion thereof, and a condensation trap connected to the said enlargement. y 7. In a carbureter for an internal combustion engine, a mixing chamber, a conduit communicating with a supply of fuel, a plurality of openings leading from said conduit into said mixing chamber, a heater located below said conduit, spring returned governor actuated ,by the engine, arocker shaft actuated by' the-governor, a plurality of levers fixed to said rocker shaft at sucfcessively increasing angles with respect thereto and connected to said valves, and- .adapted to lift the same successively asthe speed of the engine increases. 7 v in witness whereof, I have hereunto s11b-. scribed'my name, this 11th day of February A. D. 1913, in the presence 'of two subscribing witnesses. ARCHIE W. FARRELL. Clans. C. AN. valves controlling the separate openings, a 5:0 6. In a \carbureter for an internal combus-

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Cited By (7)

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    US-2452612-ANovember 02, 1948Walter A SwenbergRelief valve assembly for ventilation system
    US-2843368-AJuly 15, 1958Daimler Benz AgMeans for carbureting air for combustion in an engine
    US-2979704-AApril 11, 1961Hollis L BickfordOverload detector
    US-3869243-AMarch 04, 1975Aero Flow Dynamics Inc The WinAir/fuel ratio control means for dual fuel burners
    US-3871843-AMarch 18, 1975Ellis LeftwichLiquid fuel vaporizer
    US-4024849-AMay 24, 1977Hoots Robert GFuel atomizing device
    US-5732682-AMarch 31, 1998Aktiebolaget ElectroluxFuel amount control