Interval-demand indicating mechanism.

Abstract

Claims

J. w. BARD. INTERVAL DEMANDTNDIOATING MECHANISM. APPLICATION FILED 1330.18, 1911. 1,133,455. Patented Mar. 30, 1915. 8 SHBETSSHEET 1. a J. W. BARD. INTERVAL DEMAND INDIOATING MECHANISM. APPLICATION FILED 1120. 1a, 1911. 1,133,455, Patrited Mar.30,1915. 8 SHEETS-SHEET 2. fig. 2. Wlflgeifi 255: WW I l I #V 62 M mm m J. W. BARB INTERVAL DEMAND INDIOATING MECHANISM. APPLICATION FILED DEC. 18, 1911. 1,1 33,455. Patented Mar. 30, 3.915. 8 SHEETBBHEET 3. fig 5. I Lv/x J. W. BARB! INTERVAL DEEMED INDIUATING MEGHANISH. APPLICATION FILED DEO.18, 1911. J; w. BARB. INTERVAL DEMAND mmcume MECHANISM. APP-LIUVATION FILED DEC. 18, 1911. 1,133,455. Patented Mar. 30, 1915. 8 8HEET3-BHEBT 5. .T. W. BARD. INTERVAL DEMAND INDIGATING MECHANISM. APPLICATION FILED 1 110.18, 1911. 1,133,455, 1 Patented Mar. 30', 1915 8 SHEETS-SHEET 8. ' w d wf J. w. BARD. INTERVAL DEMAND NDIGATING MECHANISM. APPLIOATION FILED DEG. 18, 1911. 1,1 33,455. Patented Mar. 30, 1915. 8 SHEETS-SHEET 7. J. W. BARB. INTERVAL DEMAND INDIOATING MECHANISM. APPLICATION FILED DEC. 18,1911. 1,1 33,455. Patented Mar. 30, 1915. 8 SHEETSSHEET 8. TIME. WZEZESSGS: Zia/p565; W w. flwx JACOB W. BASED, OF PEORIA, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOB T0 SANGAMG ELECTRIC CGMPAB. '2', 9F SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS. INTERVALDEMAND INIDICA'I'ING MECHANISM. To all whom it may concern: Be it known that I, JACOB W. BARD, a citizen of the United States, residing at Peoria, in the county of Peoria and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Interval-Demand Indicating Mechanisms, of which the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings. My invention relates to interval demand indicating mechanisms, and its object is to should know not only the total amount of current consumed by a consumer during any period, which is readily ascertained from any of the usual types of watt-hour meters, but also that a record should be obtained of the maximum amount of current used at any time and for how long a period such a maximum demand has continue'dJ The ordinary graphic or recording meter does not give the desired information, as such instrument is designed to record continuously the varying values of pressure current or power from moment to moment. Therefore, on many loads, such as in case of a shop with rapidly changing demand on machine tools, etc, or of a streetrailway'system, the record obtained from a graphic meter is frequently a succession of sharp peaks made by move-' ments of the pen back and forth across the paper, making it difficult to ascertain from such record the actual average value of current or power demand during successive briefintervals of time. This is not so important to the central station it a customer uses a-load which may occasionally have a demand'considerably in excess of the normal for a very brief interval, say, of two or three seconds, but it is very important if the cus tomer, say, uses the energy so as torun it up to a high value for a considerable period of time, say five or ten minutes, even though the load drops down considerably and continues at the low value for a long time be Serial No. 666,511. fore another heavy demand comes on. There is, therefore, great need of a recordmg instrument which will show on a chart not the quickly varying values of current or of power, but the average demand of a given load during successive brief intervals of, say, five, ten, or thirty minutes duration, according to the nature of the load and the central station conditions. With such a record as this the central station manager is in condition to deal intelligently with a customer, basing the charge for current not only on the total number of kilowatt-hours used in a given period but also upon the ratio of maximum demand during brief intervals to the average demand of the customer. A customer who uses current at a fair average rate day in and day out and quirements, various atempts have been made to develop so-called maximum demand or interval demand meters, these all being recording devices of one kind or another, but inasmuch as the record to be obtained should be based upon the energy consumption durmg successive intervals and not upon the fluctuating power demand from moment to moment, instruments of this type have been usually developed operating from an integrating electrical meter,'or, as such meters are now known, a watt-hour meter. For instance, in one type of instrument which has been used, the watt-hour meter closes a circuit by means of a contact in its recording train at regular intervals of a'certain unit number of kilo-watt-hou'rs recorded; The closing of this circuit, operating through an electro magnet, causes a number to he printed upon a paper tape or chart, giving the total kilo-watt-hours registered by the wat'tthe kilo-watt-hours consumed in each interval of time will he obtained. With this type of instrument, however, it is necessary to SllltiiOlG means. By taking the successive readings, on the tape from each preceding reading, make subtractions of the successive readings on the tape and plot the valuesupon a chart. It is the object of my invention to pro duce an instrument which will record d1-.' rectly upon the chart the successive 'averag' e demand during desired equal intervals of time, and I therefore term my device an interval demand indicating instrument or meter. In the accompanying drawings,-Figure 1 is a front view of one form in which my invention is embodied; Fig. 2 is an end ele- 'vation of the same form shown in. Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a detail, partially in section, of the top portion of the device shown in Fig. 1; Fig. this a detail, being a cross-section on line 4. 4 of Fig. 2; Fig. 5 is a detail, being a section on, line 55 of Fig. 4:; Fig. 6 is 'a top view, being a section on line 6+6 oi." Fig. 1; Fig. 7 is a front elevation with the paper broken away to show the mechanism of another form in which I have embodied. my invention; Fig. 8 is an end view, being a section on line8-8 of Fig. 7; Fig. 9 is a top or plan view; Fig. 10 is a detail, being a vertical section on line 1010 of Fig. 9; and Fig. 11 is a chart showing a typical tracing produced by my device. Referring to the drawings,11 indicatesa controller, or positioning member, which in the embodiment of my invention shown in Figs. 1 to 6 frame. 12 indicates a plate supported upon suit- 147-15 indicate verticall'rollers journaled in suitable supportsonthef frame behind the plate 12 and adapted teema roll of paper upon which the record is traced in the manner hereinafter described. The rollers are ured by the meter to close the circuit through circuit wires 2122 connectedwith a suitable battery or other source of direct current, as 23. 24 indicates a solenoid,which is connected to the circuit wires 21 22 and is mounted in a suitable support, as .25, on the plate 12.v As the hand 20 of the'index dial 19 passes around, it makes contact in the welleknown above described, the'pawl 32'is also carried is in the "formv of a-base or able standards, as 13, fro" the base of the" of the rack-bar l7. way so as to complete the circuit through wires 21 and 22 and solenoid 24: so as to energize the same for very short periods at regular intervals ofelectric energy consumption. ' 26 indicates a core, which is adapted to enter the solenoid 24 and which, at its upper end, is pivoted to a lever 27 which is pivoted between its ends to a suitable support, as 28, carried by the plate 12. 29 indicates a bracket, which is supported upon the solenoid 24 and whose upper end extends out from the lever 27 and is pro-'' vided with a stop 30, preferably in the form of a screw, adjustable to limit the upward movement of the'lever. The lever is normally held in its upward position by means of a suitable spring, as 31, hearing against the lower end of the bracket 29 and at its upper end on the underside of the lever. 32 indicates a pawl, which is mounted upon theinner end of the lever 27 and is adapted .toengage with the teeth of the rack-bar 17; Whenever thesolenoid is energized, the core26 is drawn down into it, the outerend of the lever 27 lowered, the inner endiraise'd, and'by means of the pawl 32 j-which engagesthe teeth of the racksbar the rack-bar is raised one notch for each energ z ng of the solenoid. The pawl 32 is hinged to the end of the lever 27 and is pro- :vided with a projecting arm 33which tends to keep the pawl against the rack. 34: indicates a stop, which is pivotally mounted upon a suitable support, "as 35, and whose upper end is bent around horizontally so as to be normally held in-yieldingengagement, with the teeth of the rack-bar .17, and which, until it is thrown out of position, as hereinafter described, supports the r'aclrbar at 'any pawl 32. 36 indicates a bent wire, ally supported in' suitable, supp asy on the plate 12'andextends. downwar ,there from, across underneath and behind th the rack-bar 17. The wire 36 has a. portion given position during theif'jopei ati f th t I otal points and is'adapted to be brought in contact witha cam 39 on a horizontal-slide bar 40 which is slidingly mounted ins'uitf able supports in the machine, whereby,when 1 said slide-bar is moved inward by the operation of the solenoid hereinafter described, 1 the cam 39 forces the end 38 ofthe wire 36 inward, throwing its horizontal portion outward and freeing the stop 34 from the teeth 41 indicates a wire loop mounted on the by, when thestop 34 is moved outward as pawl 32 and surrounding the stop 34, where with it out of engagement with the teeth yieldingly in its outward position in the porting-device, as 50, from the support 47. solenoid by means of a spring 42* of suitable tension. 45 indicates a master-clock in said circuit 44 of any well-known description and adapted, by themovement of its hands at predetermined intervals in the well-known manner,t 0 complete circuit through circuit wire 44 and solenoid 43 andto maintain said circuit closed forii'a. ,very short interval of time. Whenever the solenoid ,3. is thus 'energized at regularpredetermined intervals, the core '42 isdrawn inward into the soles noid, moving the slide-bar 40 horizontally inward' with it, thus moving the camintocontact-with the arm .38of wire 36 'so'as'to] swing'the'same as above describedp46iindi mounted in. suitable supports, as 18, on the plate 12 so as to slide longitudinally'of itself 1 up and down therein. The'rackEbaris provided with an arm 47 which extends out over the upper end of rack-bar 17in registry" 8o I therewith. 49 indicates a pen stylus or equivalent vice which is carried by any suitable sup.-. at the upper end of the rack-bar 46and is adapted, in its movement hereinafter described, to trace a line upon theroll of paper 51 mounted'on the rollers 14-15. 52 indicates a stop which is pivotally mounted upon the slide-bar 40 so as to normally engage the teeth of the rack-bar 46 but to be freed therefrom when the slide- 'bar 40 moves to the right in Fig. 1 under ,the operation of thesolenoid 43 above deisadapted to be drawn into contact," with the, teethsof said rack-bar by the movement'of ftheslide bar, which frees the stop '52 from rack-46. 1'53 indicatesa solenoid in series witjhlsolenoid 43 and consequently controlled scribed. ['65 indicates alugaonthe slide-bar 40 which-is normally out of engagement with rackbarf 1 7 to -'one side thereofbut which bytheniaster-clock 45 and supported in any suitable way upon the frame 11. v Referring to Figs. 4 and 5, where these" 'parts are' best shown,54 indicates a core 1 for said solenoid 53, which is pivotally attached at its outer end to a slide-arm 55 suitably mounted in supports, as 56, mount- 6 ed on the framework so astto slide therein. ' 57 indicates a ratchet-wheel which is rigidly secured on the shaft of the roller 14 at moved by the'pawl 59." The roller and carrying a spring-seated pawl 59 the end of which is normally held in-yield ing engagement by a spring 60 against the teeth of the ratchetwheel 57. The outer end of the arm 58 is connected by means of a .slot 61 therein and a pin 62 with the slidebar 55 so that when the slide-bar 55 is moved the arm 58 is swung to one side or the other. The arm is .normally held in the position shown in Fig. 4 by a spiral spring 63.8bn-; nected at one end to said bar and atthe other end to a suitable portion of the frame. 64 indicates a spring-seated pawl pivoted on of rotation asthe arm 55 is returned to-its J .inormal position by the spring 63 when the catesasecond 'raclg-bar, which is slidingly... core 54 is released from the solenoid 53. The pawl 64, 01 course, slips over the teeth when theratchet-wheel 57 is rotated by the action of the "spring '63 and pawl 59. The operation of the'devicesso far as describedis as follows; The rack-bars, before they are acted uponas hereinafter described, are normally} in their lowest position with their lower ends" resting upon the supportxlthf-thearm-47in contact with the upper end of the: rack-bar 17. As thecurrent begins to pass, the indicating handon the dial 19, passing-around, makes contacts at regular intervals or. energy.,consumptio11 so as to complete.the;circuit-through wires 21 22 ;am1; the solenoid24so' as to, energize the same for a brief period each time contact 1s made in the j.watt-hour. meter. WVith each energizing ofthe solenoid the core is drawn down andfby, means. of the lever 27 and pawl '32. the "rack-bar" '17 is lifted up one step, lifting with itthe rackbar 46, The paper is'stationaryfand the pen therefore makes a straight'upw'ard line on the paper. At 1 regular intervals of elapsed time, which are predeterminedand may be anydesired interval of time, the clock '45 makes thecontact so as to close the circuit 44 'and energize the solenoids 43 and 53. As soon as the solenoid43' is energized the 'core'42' is drawn inward, which movesv the stop 52 out of engagementhvith rackbar-46 and the lug 65 into engagement with the:ra.cl ba'r 1 7.". -The rack-bar 17 is there- .by'held in. the position which it has reached atthis time and rack-bar 46,- if its arm 47 then rests uponithe' top of the rack-bar 17, also rem'ains in position. The further movement'of the slide 40 brings the cam 39 in'tocontaot witharm 38 of wire 36, swing- '..ing thesam'e outward and freeing boththe pawl stop 34 from the-rack-bar 17, " leaving it supported only by lug 65. The v 52 again into engagement with rack-bar 46 i time has elapsed, as indicated on the mastersame operation of the hands of the masterclock which has energized solenoid 43 has also energized solenoid 53 in series therewith, and the core 54 is thereupon drawn inward, carrying with it slide-bar 55 and rocking the arm 58 in a clockwise direction in Fig. 4, so as to be ready for a movement of the drum upon the return of the slidebar by'the spring 63. As soon as the cur rent is broken, which is done after a very short interval of time, the solenoid 53 is deenergized and the arm 55 returns to its normal position under the influence ofspring 63 and'arm 58, and the pawl 59 engaging the teeth of the ratchet-wheel 57 gives to the drum 14 a small degree of rotation, thus causing a horizontal mark of the pen upon the drum. As the circuit is broken solenoid 43 is also deenergized, causing the cor-e42 under the influence of spring 42* to resume its normal position. This moves the stop so as to hold it in the same position and moves the lug 65 out of engagement with the rack-bar 17, whichthe pawl 32 and stop 34 not being yetreturned to their normal position-is free to drop to the bottom to its zero position. The cam is next freed from the arm 38 of wire 36 and the pawl 32 and stop 34 immediately come into engagement again with rack-bar l7 ready to repeat the operation. The meter cont nuing to run, the rack-bar '17 is again raised notch by notch until the next interval of clock. If a less amount of energy has been consumed during this time than during the last interval of time; the top of the rackbar 17 will not reach the arm 47 at the top of the rack-bar 46 and a space will therefore be left between them. As soon as the solenoid 43, therefore, is again energized after the same interval of time and the stop 52 is therebydisengaged from rack-bar 46, the rack-bar, 46 will drop until arm 47 reaches the top of rack-bar 17 and the pen will trace a corresponding vertical line from the last horizontal line caused by the rota- .tion of the drum to a position limited by the rising movement of the rack-bar 17. In case, however, a greater amount of energy should have been used than during the last 7 interval, the rack-bar l7 will rise to con tact with thecross-arm 47, and the upward movement continuing, will raise with it therack-bar 46 until the time interval has again elapsed and the circuits completed through solenoids 43 and 53as above described. In, this case the vertical line will be traced upward by the pen on the roll of paper from the last horizontal line caused by the partigal rotation of the rollto a point equal to the rise of the rack-bar 17 by its successive 5 actuations during the same interval of time. It will be understood, of course, that this operation 'will be repeated as long as current is being used and the chart will show a line from which the average interval demand of'the user can be at once seen. A typical chart as produced by the operation of my device is shown in Fig. 11. It will be obvious from the above description that during successive equal time intervals the pen will move up and down on the chart that is to say, in the direction which indicates the amount. of energy consumedonly when the amount of energy varies between successive time intervals, and that if the same amount of energy is used during successive time intervals the position of the penpoint on the chart will not be varied except as the paper roll winds. If, therefore, at successive intervals the amount of energy consumed should be the same, the successive movements of the roller at the successive time intervals would cause the pen point to travel along the chart in a horizontal line after each interval. This is well shown in the accompanying chart, which, as has been said, has been taken from an actual trial of the instrument, and shows the line made over' twelve hours time. I have described above one form in which my invention may be embodied audits operation. *In Figs. 7, 8, 9 and 10, however, I have shown another form which, for mechanical and structural reasons, is preferable. This form, generally speaking, differs from the form above described in that instead of straight racks the racks are in the form of ratchet wheels, and consequently a number of other changes in mechanical details are made to suit that construction. Referring to those figures,70 indicates a base and 71 the frame supported on the base. 72 indicates the dial of a meter of ordinary type to make contacts in circuit 73 so as to close the same at regular intervals of electric energy consumption as integrated by the meter. 74 indicates a ratchet-wheel having ratchet teeth on its periphery, which is ournaled in suitable bearings, as 75, supported moved out of position and left free to return, as hereinafter described, it will return to its original position. 78 indicates a pin on the upper surface of the ratchet-wheel 74, which is normally in position against a stop 79 suitably mounted on the frame-and which stops the wheel at the'point indicated when after being brought out of normal position, as hereinafter described, it is left free to return, and does return, to it. The stop 79 operates to limit the movement of the wheel and stop it in normal position in the same way that the standard 16 does in the first-described form of my device. 80 indicates a solenoid in the circuit 73, which is momentarily energized each time that the circuit is completed by the meter 72. 81 indicates a core within said solenoid, which is, of course, drawn into it every time that the solenoid is energized. The core is pivotally connected at its outer end with a lever 82 which is pivoted at one end to a suitable pivotal support, as 83, on the frame and which carries pivotally suspended at the other end a pawl 84 which is held in yielding contact with the teeth of the ratchet-wheel 74 by a suitable spring, as 85. Every time that the solenoid is energized, as more fully described hereinafter, the core 81 is drawn inward, lifting the lever 82, and thus, through the pawl 84, moving the ratchet-wheel 74 around one notch in a clockwise direction in Fig. 9. 86 indicates a ratchet-wheel, which is rotatably mounted on the shaft of the wheel 74. 87 indicates a pin, which is mounted on the upper surface of the ratchet-wheel 86 in register with the pin 76 on ratchet-wheel 74, whereby as said ratchet-wheel 74 is moved by the solenoids above described the movement through pins 76 and 87 is communicated to the ratchet-wheel 86 which is rotated thereby with the wheel 87 in the same direction and in the same amount. 88 indicates a sheave, which is rigidly secured upon the shaft of ratchet-wheel 86, or formed inafter described. 94 indicates a stylus or re-' cording pen, which is carried by the carriage 92 and adapted to bear upon the roll of paper or chart hereinafter described. 9596 indicate rollers, which are journaled upon suitable shafts, as 9798, respectively, in the frame work of the machine. 99 indicates a roll of paper, which is secured to'the drums and is wound off one on to theother in the manner hereinafter described. The roll of paper is, of course, ruled by lines across each other at'right angles into divisions which in one direction indicate watt-hours and in the other predetermined periods of time, such as is shown on the chart in Fig. 11, andin the usual manner. This ruling is not indicated on the other figures of the drawings as it is well known and would only tend to obscure the drawings. 100"indicates a ratchet-wheel, which is rigidly secured to the shaft 97 of roller 95. 101 indicates an arm, which is pivotally mounted at one end on the shaft of the drum 95 and carries pivotally mounted thereon a pawl 102 which is adapted to engage the teeth of the ratchet-wheel 100. 103 indicates a pawl, which is pivoted on the framework at a suitable point and engages the ratchet-wheel 100 upon the opposite side from the arm 101 so as to hold the wheel in any position as it is moved by the pawl 102. Both the pawls 102 and 103 are held by springs, as 104 and 105, respectively, in yielding engagement in the usual manner with the teeth of the ratchet-wheel 100. The outer end of the arm 101 is provided with a slot 106 which engages a pin 107 on a rod 108 which is slidingly mounted in suitable supports, as 109, in the framework so as to slide longitudinally of itself therein. The rod is normally held yieldingly upward by any suitable spring, as 110. The lower'end of the rod 108 is connected with a core 111 of a solenoid 112 which is connected to circuit wires 113. 114 indicates a master-clock which is adapted, in the well known way at suitable intervals of time, to make contact so as to complete the circuit through the wires 113 and the solenoid 112. When the solenoid 112 is thus energized at predetermined regular interarm 101 around upon its pivot, the pawl 102 sliding over the ratchet teeth of the ratchet-wheel 100, which is held in position by pawl 103. Whenever the solenoid 112 is deenergized, the rod 108 is pulled upward by the spring 110, swinging the arm 101 in a clockwise direction in Fig. 8, cansing the pawl 102 to engage the teeth of ratchet-wheel 100, giving it and with it the roller 95 a clockwise rotation, thus winding up the roll of paper 99 upon roller 95 and off roller 96. 115 indicates a solenoid, which, by circuit wires 116, is connected with the masterclock 114 in series with solenoid 112 above described. 117 indicates a core for said solenoid 115, which is normally held upward by a suitable spring like that shown in the solenoid 43 in Fig. 3. 118 indicates a slide-bar slidingly mounted in suitable supports on the frame and connected at its inner end with the outer end of the core 117 whereby, when said core is drawn into the solenoid 115 by the energizing ofsaid solenoid, or when said core is pushed out by the action of the spring when said solenoid is deenergized, the bar 118 is reciprocated in one direction or the other. 119 indicates a dog or stop which is pivotally mounted in a suitable support, as 120, and is held by a suitable spring, as 121, in yielding engagement with the teeth of ratchet-wheel 7 4. The pawl 84 is provided with a lug122, which, by means of a link 123, is connected with the dog-119, whereby, when said dog 119 is swung out from engagement with the ratchet-wheel 74, it carries with it the pawl 84; out of engagement with the.ratchetwheel. 124 indicates a cam on the slide-bar 118, which is adapted, when said slide-bar is moved down by the drawing down of. the core. 117, to be brought into contact with the under side of said dog- 119 and swing the same away from the ratchet-wheel 74, swinging with it the pawl 84. 125 indicates a latch-on slide-bar 118, which is normally in yielding engagement with the teeth of the ratchet-w-heel 86 so as to permit the teeth of thesame to slip over it when rotated in a clockwise direction in Fig. 9 and to hold 1t against backward rotation when the latch is in place. 126 indicatesa latch,.which is normally out. of engagement with theteeth of the ratchet-wheel 74 but which is adapted to be brought in engagement with the same the downward movement of the sliderod 118 so as to hold the said ratchet-wheel, while said latch is in engagement therewith, against backward rotation. The operation of the parts above described is as follows: The position of the parts. shown. in Fig. 9 is the position in' "which the parts are when. the hand on the meter is at zero. When the current begins to pass, the hand of the dial 1s,'of.- course, turned therewith inaccordance with the rate of the current flow, and as the meter .makes the contact through clrcint 73 at regular intervals of energy expended, the solenoid 80 is momentarily energized, the core 81 pulled inward, the lever 82 carried therewith, and, by means of the pawl 84, the ratchet-wheel 74 is moved around one notch, which motion is communicated by thepins 76 and 87 to the ratchet-wheel 79 and sheave 88, which, of course, are thereby ing with it the slide-rod 118, thus freeinglatch 125 from wheel 86 but pulling latch 126 into engagement with ratchet-wheel 74. The wheel86 is, therefore, prevented from returning to its normal position because wheel 74 is held in position by the latch 126 and because the pins 76 and 87 are in contact. As the downward movement of the rod 118 reaches nearly its innermost position, the cam 124 coming in contact with dog 119 rocks the same out ofengagement with the teeth of the ratchet-wheel 7 6, carrying the pawl 84* also out of engagement with the ratchet-wheel-74. As soon as the hands of the clock pass off the contact and thecircuit through circuit wires 113 and 116v is broken, solenoids 112 and 115 are deenergized. The deenergizing of solenoid 112 allows the spring 110 to pull the rod'108 and core 111 upward into their original position, rocking the arm 101 in a clockwise movement, causing pawl 102 to make a partial rotation of roller 95, giving the paper a short forward movement which causes the pento make a short line at right angles to the original line which indicated energy consinned. The deenergizing of solenoid 115 causes the core 117 to be projected upward by the action of the spring similar to that shown in-solenoid 43, which brings latch 125 again into. engagement with ratchetwheel 86, holding it in this position. At the same time latch 126 is moved out of engagement with ratchet-wheel 74, which is thereupon 'at once returned to its original zero position with the pin 78 against stop 79 by the action of the spring 77, the dog 119,. and . pawl 84'being still held out of position by the cam. 124. As the cam moves upward it is freed from engagement withthe dog 119, causing it and pawl 84 to be again brought intoengagement with the ratchet-wheel 74. The movement above described is thereupon repeated as long as the current continues to run. Y As with the first form of my apparatus described, if during the next time interval, the'amount of energy used is less than what was used'in the last preceding interval, the pin 76 will not bebrought into contact with pin 87 because of the lesser amount of rotation of. ratchet-wheel 74' and because ratchet-wheel 86 has been held, in its original position,1as above. described. Upon the energizing, therefore, of the-solenoid 115 to move the bar inward. as before, upon the-expiration of the next time interval, the freeing of the latch 125 from the wheel 86 will leave it free to rotate, and under the action of the weight it will rotate in a contraclockwise direction in Fig. 9 until the pin 87 comes in contact with pin 76, causing the pen to make a straight line along the stationary paper parallel with the mark made by. the first outward movement so as to in dicate the dlfi'erence in energy used during the ratchet 86 will be moved farther around in a clockwise direction, carrying the pen still farther outward along the sheet in a line parallel with the first line and longer than the first line by an amount proportionate to the greater amount of energy used. At the end of each predetermined period of time the operation above described is repeated. If the amount of energy in any period should exactly equal that used during the preceding period, the ratchet-wheel 74 will be rotated exactly the same amount as in the previous period and the pin 76 will just be'brought into contact with the pin 87, and the movement of. the paper by the rotation of the roll will cause simply a continuation of the straight line at right angles with the line indicating the amount of energy consumed, whereby both the amount of energy used and the duration of time are indicated. Precisely the same chart would be made under similar circumstances by the apparatus shown in Figs. 7 to 10 as that above referred to, which was produced by an apparatus like that first above described, the only difference being that in one case the paper moves in a vertical and the other in a horizontal plane. In addition to the forms shown, my invention may be embodied in various other ways, and the claims hereinafter made are, therefore, to be construed accordingly. That which I claim as my invention, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is,- 1. A graphic recording instrument, comprising means for intermittently. moving a chart at predetermined time intervals, a stylus operating on said chart and movable transversely thereof, and electrically-operated means adapted to positively move-said stylus in one direction and controlling its range of movement in the opposite direction. 2. A graphic recording instrument, comprising means for intermittently moving a. chart at predetermined time intervals, a stylus operating on said chart and movable transversely thereof, and intermittently-acting electrically-operated means adapted to positively move said stylus in one direction and controlling its range of movement in the opposite direction. 3. A' raphic recording instrument, comprising means'for intermittently moving a chart at predetermined time intervals, a stylus. operating on said chart and movable transversely thereof, retaining means for holding said stylus against reverse movement while the chart is in motion and acting to releasethe stylus after the chart stops, positively move said stylus in one direction and controlling its range of movement in the opposite direction. 4. A graphic recording instrument, comprising electricallyoperated means for intermittently moving a chart at predetermined time intervals, a stylus operating on said chart and moving transversely thereof, means controlled by said chart moving means for retaining said stylus in a fixed position while .the chart is in motion, and electrically-operated means adapted to posi tively move said stylus in one direction and controlling its range of movement in the opposite direction. 5. A graphic recording instrument, comprising means for intermittently moving a chart :.-'at predetermined time intervals, a stylus operating on .said chart andmovable transversely thereof, means controlled by saidchart-moving means for retaining said styles; in a fixed position while the chart is in motion, and intermittently-acting electrically-operated means adapted to positively move said stylus in one direction and controlling its range of movement in the opposite direction. 6. A graphic recording instrument, comprising means for moving a chart at predetermined time intervals, a stylus operating on said chart and movable transversely thereof, retaining means controlled by said chart-moving means for holding said stylus against reverse movement while the chart is in motion and acting to release the stylus after the chart stops, and electrically-operated means adapted to positively move said stylus in one direction and controlling its range of movement in the opposite direction. 7. A graphic recording instrument, comprising electrically-operated means for intermittently moving a chart at predetermined time intervals, a stylus operating on saidchart and moving transversely thereof, means controlled by said chart-moving means for retaining said stylus in a fiXed .position while the chart is in motion, and intermittently acting electrically operated means adapted to positively move said stylus iirone direction and controlling its range ofmovement in the opposite direction. 8. A graphic recording instrument, comprising electrically-operated means for intermittently moving a chart at predetermined time intervals, a stylus operating on said chart and moving transversely thereof, means controlled by said chart-moving means for retaining said stylus in a fiXed position while the chart is in motion, and intermittently acting electrically operated means adapted to positively move said stylus in one direction and controllip g its range of movement in the opposite direction, said stylus retaining means being adapted to release the stylus after the chart stops. 9. A graphic recording instrument, comprising means for intermittently moving a chart at predetermined time intervals, a stylus operating on said chart and movable transversely thereof, intermittently-operated means for moving said stylus in one direction and controlling its range of movement in the opposite direction, and an electric meter adapted to actuate said stylus-moving-means in one direction. 10. A graphic recording instrument, comprising means for intermittently moving a chart at predetermined time intervals, a stylus operating on said chart and movable transversely thereof, intermittently-operated means for moving said stylus in one direction and controlling its range of movement in the opposite direction, and an electric meter adapted to actuate said stylus-mov ng means in one direction, said stylus-moving means being adapted to return to its initial position at the beginning of each of said time intervals. 11. A graphic recording instrument, comprising means for intermittently moving a chart at predetermined time intervals, a stylus operating on said chart and movable transversely thereof, intermittently-operated means for m'oving said stylus in one direction and controlling its range of movement in the opposite direction, an electric meter adapted to actuate said stylus-moving means in one direction, and means controlled by said chart-moving means for retaining said stylus in a fixed position while the chart is i in motion. '12. A graphic recording instrument, comprisingmeans for intermittently moving a chart at predetermined time intervals, a stylus operating on said chart and movable transversely thereof, an electric meter, and means actuated by the operation of said meter to positively move said stylus in one direction and to limit its range of movement in the opposite direction. v 13. A graphic recording instrument, comprising means for intermittently moving a chart at predetermined time intervals, a stylus operating on said chart and movable transversely thereof, an electric meter, and a controlling member adapted to be ad. vanced from its initial position during each of said time intervals to an extent corresponding with the energy consumption during such interval as indicated by said meter and then to return to its initial position, and means for retaining said stylus during each period of movement of the chart in a position corresponding to that occupied by said controlling member-'at-the-end of the preceding time interval. A graphic recording instrument, compr sing means forintermittently moving a chart at predetermined time intervals, a {stylus operating on said chart and movable .tra'nsversely thereof, and electrically-operated means adapted to positively move said stylus in one direction while the chart is stationary and controlling its range of movement inthe opposite direction. 15. In combination, a moving element, electrically actuated mechanism adapted to give to said moving element a step by step movement for equal increments of electric energy consumed, a second moving element adapted to be engaged by said first moving element and moved therewith, mechanism adapted to permit the automatic return of said moving elements toward normal posi- I tion at the end of predetermined intervals of time, chart-carrying mechanism adapted to hold a chart, intermittently acting mech-. anism adapted at said predetermined intervals of time to actuate said chart-carrying mechanism to move said chart intermittently, and a stylus 1n operative connection I with said second moving element and adapted to move transversely of and bear upon said chart. l6. In combination, a moving element adapted to automatically return to normal position when free to move, electrically actu ated mechanism adapted to give to said moving element a step by step movement out of normal position for equal increments of expended electrical energy, a second moving element adapted to be engaged by said first movingelement and moved therewith, and. tending to automatically return toward normal position when free to so return, a stylus operatively connected with said second moving element, chart-holding mechanism, mechanism. adapted at the-end of predetermined intervals of time to alternately engage anddisengage said first moving element and to alternately disengage and en- 4 gage said second movingelement and hold the same in position until the end of the next predetermined interval; of time, 'and intermittently acting mechanism adapted at said predetermined intervals oftime to operate said chart-holding mechanism to give said chart a limited intermittent movement ing to automatically return toward normal position when free to do so and adapted to be engaged by said first moving device and moved therewith, mechanism adapted at the end of predetermined intervals of time to engage said first moving device, tem orarily hold it in its position, and then ree the same from engagement, mechanism normally in engagement with said second moving device and adapted at said predetermined intervals of time to disengage and then reengage said second moving device and retain it during the next time interval, , chart-holding mechanism adapted to hold a chart, intermittently acting mechanism adapted at said predetermined intervals of time to operate said chart-holding mechanism to give said chart a limited intermittent movement, and a stylus operatively con-- nected to said second moving device and adapted to move transversely of and bear upon a chart carried by said chart-holding mechanism. 18. An electric circuit, an electricity meter adapted to intermittently close said-circuit for equal increments of. expended electric energy, a moving element adapted normally to automatically return to zero position when moved out of the same, means; adapted to give to said moving element a step by step movement with each closing of said circuit, a second moving element adapted to be engaged by said first moving element and move therewith and adapted to automatically return toward normal position after being moved out of the same and when free to move, mechanism adapted at the end of regular predetermined timeintervals to first 'free said second moving element and engage said first moving element and then engage and retain said second moving element during the next time interval and free said first moving element, chart-holding mechanlsm, intermittently acting means for giving said chart-holding mechanism a movement to move the chart heldthereby intermittently at predetermined time intervals, and a stylus operatively connected with said second moving element and adapted to move trans-' versely of andvinscribe said chart. ' 19. In combination, a positioning-mem ber,mechanism adapted to give to sand positioning-member a movement for equal increments of electrical energy consumed, an engaging device adapted to be brought into engagement withsaid positioning-member, mechanism adapted at the end of predetermined intervals of time to move said engaging device temporarily into and then out of engagement with said positioning-member, a stylus-carrying member adapted to be moved by said positioning-member, chartcarrying mechanism, an engaging device adapted normally to engage said stylus-carrying member and when so engaged hold it in position, mechanism adapted at the end of each of said predetermined intervals of time to first temporarily free said engaging member from said stylus-carrying member and then rengage the same, and intermittently acting mechanism adapted at said predetermined intervals of time to move said chart-carrying mechanism intermittently. 20. In combination, an electrical circuit, a meter connected with said circuit and adapted to close the same intermittently at predetermined increments of electrical energy consumed, a moving member adapted, when free to move, to rest normally in zero posltion, means operated by the closing of said circuit to give said moving member a step-by-step movement, an engaging device normally out of engagement with said moving member, means for moving said engaging device at the end of predetermined intervals of time temporarily into engagement and then out of engagement with said moving device, a stylus-carrying member having a device adapted to be engaged by said moving member whereby said stylus-carry mg member may be moved by said moving member, an engaging device normally in engagement with said stylus-carrying member, mechanism operated at the end of said predetermined intervals of time to temporarily free said engaging device from said stylus-carrying member and then cause it to engage the same, chart-carrying mechanism, and intermittently acting mechanism adapted at said predetermined intervals of time to cause said chart-carrying mechanism to move the chart carried thereby intermittently. 21. In combination, a moving member adapted when free to rest in zero position, electric mechanism adapted at predetermove said stop first into temporary engagement with said moving member and then out of engagement with the same, chartcarrying mechanism, a stylus-carrying member provided with a pen adapted to bear on the chart, a device on said stylus-carrying member adapted to be engaged by said first member whereby said stylus-carrying member may be moved with the step-by-step actuation of said first member, a stop device normally in engagement with said styluscarrying member, mechanism adapted at the end of said predetermined intervals of time to first move said stop temporarily out of engagement with said stylus-carrying member and then into engagement with it again, and intermittently acting mechanism adapted at said predetermined intervals oi time to operate said chart-carrying mechanism to move said chart'intermittently. 22. In combination, a moving member adapted when free to rest in zero position, 5 electric mechanism adapted at predeterh mined increments of electrical energy to give said moving-member a step-by-step motion, a stop normally out of engagement With said moving member, mechanism adapted at the end of predetermined intervals of time }to move said stop first into temporary engagement .with said moving member and jjthen out of engagement vvvith the same, chartcarrying mechanism, a stylus-carrying mem- 'v b er provided .With a pen adapted to bear on the chart, a device on said stylus carrying member adapted to be engaged by said first member whereby said stylus-carrying member may be moved with the step-by-step actllation-of said first member, means for nor- .mally bringing said device on said styluscarry1ng member into engagement with said and then mto engagement with it a ain, and interm ttently acting mechanism adapted at said predetermined intervals of time to ;operate said chart-carrying mechanism to meve, said chart mtermittently. t JACOB W. BARD. Wit esses; , ,T. A. SCHLINK, ' ,Jmms P., MURPHY. gagement with said stylus-carrying member v

Description

Topics

Download Full PDF Version (Non-Commercial Use)

Patent Citations (0)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle

NO-Patent Citations (0)

    Title

Cited By (2)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    US-3216019-ANovember 02, 1965Geolograph CoOperations recorder
    US-3461456-AAugust 12, 1969Willy HoflerApparatus for automatically determining the total pitch error of gears or the like